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Oklahoma Bar Association

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Law Day

Contest Winners

The OBA Law Day Committee would like to thank Oklahoma educators, students and their families for participating in the Law Day Contest. This year, nearly 1,300 students from 46 towns and about 70 schools and home school groups entered the contest.

First- through 12th-grade students demonstrated their knowledge of the history and concepts of the theme through essays and multimedia art. Pre-K and kindergarten students were given a choice of coloring activity pages related to the theme, allowing them to show off their budding creative and writing abilities. For both elementary and secondary students, the contest gave them an opportunity to explore how the First Amendment helps guarantee and protect all Americans’ rights. Read about this year's contest on the Contest page.

Click on an entry to see it larger or continue reading.

Grand Prize Winner

12th Grade Art

Jesse Anderson, Owasso

Pre-K Coloring

First Place

Emma Brielle Duarte, Pauls Valley

Second Place

Aubrielle Haubert, Stillwater

Honorable Mentions

Selma Cody, Ada; Meadow Bales, Tulsa; Callie Lewallen, Morrison

Kindergarten Coloring

First Place

Eva Kelly, Tulsa

Second Place

Jacob Ponticelli, Vian

Honorable Mentions

Lucy Brocksmith, Oklahoma City; Mackenzie Gee, Salina; Amayah Butcher, Salina; Adelyne Gibson, Stuart; Ellionna Johnson, Vian; Haylee Hays, Vian

First Grade Art

First Place

Gordon Bryan, Glenpool

Second Place

Kellan Neely, Shawnee

 

First Grade Writing

First Place

Luke Kauffman, Tulsa

Honorable Mention

Molly Jo McNabb, Coweta

Second Grade Art

First Place

Amelia Kwok, Oklahoma City

Second Place

Brody Gilliam, Stillwater

Second Grade Writing

Honorable Mention

Colton Denton, Stillwater

Third Grade Art

First Place

Sophie Buchanan, Harrah

Second Place

Ansley Brown Leedey

Honorable Mentions

Bruce Campbell, Stillwater

Third Grade Writing

First Place

Eleanor Duel, Edmond

The Nineteenth Amendment and Women's Right to Vote
People like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton worked for forty years to win a basic right. On August 18, 1920, twenty-six million women finally got the right to vote. I think that made everything change. The women's right to vote took fifty years to be accomplished, but in the end, women got to vote. I think the Nineteenth Amendment and the women's right to vote is important because women need to get to make more choices. I also think it is good because it does not just give women the right to vote, but it gives women many other opportunities to do other things, like being a surgeon or a lawyer. Read the full essay.

Second Place

Elijah McDaniel Stillwater

The Nineteenth Amendment gave women the right to vote. Why is that right important?
It is important that women can vote, just like men. The Constitution tells us that all men are created equal. It means women, too. If all men and women are equal, then if men get to vote, women should get to vote, too. Women are smart. They can be just as smart as men, or even smarter. They can know as much about our country as men do. They can have ideas about how our country should work, just like men. Since women are smart, they should be able to vote. Read the full essay.

Honorable Mentions

Logan Lee, Stillwater; Betsy Tucker, Pauls Valley; Arianna Snyder, Skiatook; Ella Parks, Seminole

Fourth Grade Art

First Place

Dustin Hitchcock, Stillwater

Second Place

Boston Hardin, Yukon

Honorable Mention

Caleb Kennedy, Stillwater

Fourth Grade Writing

First Place

Hannah Kauffman, Tulsa

The Eagle and the Pitcher: A Fable on the Right to Vote
It was a scorching day, and it seemed as if the sun could not be squelched by any cloud, no matter the size. The desolate landscape consisted of a scraggly undersized couple of trees and a vast sea of dry Bermuda grass. A few perched birds were soaring high above the ground, scavenging for any sign of water.
In the 1600s Galileo discovered that the earth moved around the sun. The Catholic church believed that the sun moved around the earth and tried to keep Galileo silent. If they had succeeded our science would be skewed and scientific discoveries would have been slowed. It is important for us to have good knowledge even if it disagrees with tradition, religion, or previous scientific thoughts. Read the full essay. 

Second Place

Emmagene Kuehl Stillwater

My Right to Vote
The right to vote is important because voting gives me the chance to have a say in who will be my leader in government. Voting is the way I use my voice to give my opinion and choose the views that best represent what I believe is right. Voting is not a right that every person in the world has. One hundred years ago it was not a right that women had, even here in America. Women were considered to be valued at home, but their voice in government was not recognized.
Read the full essay. 

Fifth Grade Art

First Place

Savanna Moser, Marlow

Second Place

Paetyn Giliam, Stillwater

 

Fifth Grade Writing

First Place

Nihal Zehra Erez, Oklahoma City

A Vote, A Dream
Voting. That thing you have to do every once in a while. As you plump yourself on your couch after a long day of work and see candidates debating on TV and you think, why is voting so important. Why do people take so much time just deciding on who or what to vote for? I’ll tell you why. Because voting represents us and who we are, it helps us take part in our democracy, it keeps freedom alive, it helps people, it helps the environment. Read the full essay.

Second Place

Alice Greenwalt, Blanchard

Why Do You Believe the Right to Vote Is Important?
Voting is a basic democratic right that should be protected, and promoted, which is why many people are surprised that the U.S. constitution provides no explicit right to vote. The importance of voting is one of the most important rights that U.S. citizens have. Nobody can force people to vote, however many people do vote, because voting lets us tell the government what we want to do and is a very important part of any democracy.

Honorable Mentions

Londyn Watkins, Stillwater

Sixth Grade Art

First Place

Addyson Harmon, Tonkawa

 

Second Place

Mahala Latta, Poteau

Honorable Mention

Megan McGuire, Skiatook

Sixth Grade Writing

First Place

Ellie Cheng, Oklahoma City

A Brief Comparative History of Suffrage in Peru and the United States
Peru was a colony of Spain from the year 1533, when the conquistador Francisco Pizzarro claimed it for Spain to "westernize it" and gain political power for himself. Spanish -born Peruvians and native Incas declared their Independence from Spain on July 28, 1821. On August 27, 1821, indigenous peoples were granted citizenship. The first form of democracy in Peru was called the Nominal Democracy and existed between 1822-1895.Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Addy Ramsey, Skiatook

Comparison of Venezuela and United States Voting Rights
Voting rights play an important part in society. They allow people to express their opinion about how their country should be run. Voting rights vary from country to country. This paper will compare and contrast the voting rights between Venezuela and the United States. The first general election was held in Venezuela on December 14th, 1947. This was the first honest election in Venezuela. This election used compulsory voting which requires citizens to vote in elections, and failure to vote could result in a punishment. Read the entire essay.

Honorable Mention

Miles Bryan, Stillwater

Seventh Grade Art

First Place

Julie Castillo, Skiatook

 

Second Place

Alyne Judkins, Hobart

 

Honorable Mention

Ella Haiges, Edmond

Seventh Grade Writing

First Place

Jessica Myers, Skiatook

United States vs. Iraq, More Than a War
The country I chose to compare voting rights with the United States was Iraq. I chose Iraq because when I was one month old my dad was deployed to Iraq for the first 15 months of my life. The United States has a more advanced voting system, dating back to the late 1600's. Iraq dates to the biblical days but did not become a county until 1932. Their first 'free' election was 73 years later. The United States military protected the Iraqi poll booths to give the citizens of Iraq a safe voting experience. Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Addisyn Miller, Skiatook

Time to Vote! US vs. UK
The United Kingdom and the United States are very similar in the way that their government evolved in the department of voting. Both countries have a democratic government. The US has a presidential government and the UK has a parliamentary government. The voting rights of each country are almost indistinguishable. The minimum age to vote is 18 years, both men and women are allowed to vote, and there are no wealth barriers. Read the entire essay.

Honorable Mention

Brielle Anderson, Skiatook

Eighth Grade Art

First Place

Hannah Harris, Oklahoma City

 

Second Place

Ava Creekmur, Tulsa

 

Honorable Mentions

Austin Buchanan, Harrah; Heidi McQuay, Skiatook; Max Bruner, Tulsa

Eighth Grade Writing

First Place

Emma Neff, Edmond

A History of Women’s Rights

The fight for equal rights has always been an important part of America's rich history. Women gained their entitlements as American citizens by revolting against the normalities of their time to stand up for themselves and their rights. The story of how it began lies in the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, the birthplace of American feminism. As the very first women's rights convention in the U.S., it served as a starting point for the women's suffrage movement. Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Murphy Barnett, Norman

Dearest Mary,
I am writing to you to tell you about this amazing convention I attended yesterday. It was called the Seneca Falls Convention and it was all about our rights as women. It's a two day convention that women could attend! Men could attend today, July 20th, but the first day was exclusively for women! Read the entire essay.

Honorable Mentions

Brayden Hughes, Tulsa; Tara Samiee, Tulsa

Ninth Grade Art

First Place

Lorene Arneecher, Salina

Second Place

Emma Page, Cushing

 

 

Honorable Mention

Peyton Bull, Duncan

Ninth Grade Writing

First Place

Nathalia Mireles-Mota, Tulsa

The Women’s Suffrage Movement
The women's suffrage movement had a lasting impact on the United States, giving women rights and opportunities that changed the future of the country. Many do not often realize that the movement was not solely focused on voting rights. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, author of the Declaration of Sentiments, made the intentions of the movement clear at the Seneca Falls Convention, held in 1948. Among other things, women in the early 1800's to 1920's wanted emancipation from social constructs within marriage and the workforce. Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Gabe Thomas, Tulsa

Read the entire essay.

Honorable Mention

Mikhayla Minear, Salina

Tenth Grade Art

First Place

Thomas Buchanan, Harrah

Second Place

Cam Hang Tsan, Tulsa

Honorable Mention

Aréta Carr, Oklahoma City; Madison Allen, Oklahoma City; Maura Wilkerson, Oklahoma City

Tenth Grade Writing

First Place

Bryce Philips, Kiefer

The Road to the 19th Amendment
When the ballots first started
They filled with white men
Complaints were not spoken
Since the country just began
Then the country had grown
The ballots, not changed
Minorities wanted voting rights
And asked that things be rearranged
Read the entire entry.

Second Place

Kaylee Sprangler, Kiefer

The 19th Amendment

About a hundred years ago there were laws
From these laws people would quote
That women couldn’t run for office
Or have the right to vote.
All throughout the 1800’s
When rights were only male
Women marched and protested
And even went to jail.
Read the entire entry.

Honorable Mentions

Logan Jones, Kiefer; Jamarius Smith, Lawton

Eleventh Grade Art

First Place

Palmer Strubhar, Piedmont

Second Place

Aubrey Topping, Marlow

 

Eleventh Grade Writing

First Place

Palmer Strubhar, Piedmont

The Plight of the Suffragettes and their Enduring Legacy
The courageous suffragettes of the Women's Suffrage Movement of 1920 tipped over the first domino that led to an unstoppable force of female empowerment that spread across the world. Had women not rallied together to get the right to vote, the past 100 years would have been extremely different. Luckily, the protests and rallies of the suffrage movement were not only impactful, but also inspirational for years to come. While the amount of changes that resulted from the suffrage movement are vast, I will highlight three specific achievements which have greatly impacted today's culture. Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Bryce Cutts, Edmond

Chains That Confine Us

Chains that confine us
Work all day and all night
Equality shared, my friends and I
Beauty she is a man and not
Hard to see the likes of my eyes
We know who is and isn’t
Take away these shackles
These chains that confine us
We are like you are we not?
Read the entire entry.

Honorable Mention

Nathaniel Bowman, Lawton; Hunter Fox, Taloga

Twelfth Grade Art

First Place

Katie Williams, Pocola

Second Place

Tanner Luetjen, Tulsa

Honorable Mention

Emily Peters, Tulsa

Twelfth Grade Writing

First Place

Katie McQuay, Skiatook

The Growth of Voting Rights in the United States
When considering changes in American voting laws to include minorities, many people only think of the 15th and 19th amendments, which were supposed to remove voting limitations based on race and gender, respectively.1 However, these amendments are not the only critical historical changes to voting laws in America, and they were not always as successful at bringing equal suffrage as most people assume. When the nation was first founded, only landowning white male adults were given a nationwide vote while today, almost every U.S. citizen has a say in the election process. Read the entire essay.

Second Place

Alyssa Hall, Tulsa

The 19th Amendment

Can we say
She marches down the cold, paved streets,
A chanted rhythm she repeats
And though her voice is loud and clear
The states refuse to lend an ear.
Her sentiments have been declared,
At Seneca Falls her teeth are bared,
She’s Stanton, she’s Anthony, she’s Chapman Catt,
The “cult of womanhood” bespat.
Read the entire poem.

Honorable Mention

Hannah Rystedt, Tulsa